Tessa Mars: full free | Closeup

Haitian artist Tessa Mars is influenced by her country’s revolutionary history as much as her own family’s intellectual tradition, and her lifelong fascination with riddles. Her colourful paintings often feature a semi-autobiographical character named Tessalines — and deal in complex ideas about identity and freedom. Shereen Ali finds out more

Converstion with Hector H (2015, acrylic on canvas, 65.3 x 65.3 cm). Courtesy Tessa Mars

Inner-city art in Kingston

For middle-class Jamaicans and tourists alike, downtown Kingston, with its deprived communities, can seem off-limits. So when a group of young artists began a public mural project in the Fleet Street area, it wasn’t just about beautifying the neighbourhood, writes Tanya Batson-Savage. It was really about opening opportunities for local residents

Fanny Eaton: forgotten beauty

In the paintings of the nineteenth-century British Pre-Raphaelite artists, one “exotic” face stands out. Fanny Eaton, born in Jamaica, was a mixed-race model who found herself, for a few years, near the heart of Victorian London’s art world — and was long forgotten. Judy Raymond tells what’s known of her story

Kingston beat

For many visitors to Jamaica, the capital Kingston, at the foot of the Blue Mountains, is just the gateway to the country’s beach resorts. But, as Tanya Batson-Savage explains, Kingston’s bustling cosmopolitan scene and dynamic cultural offerings make it an essential destination. Here’s her list of must-sees and must-dos, from art to music to cuisine

Jewels of the Caribbean

Featuring the craftsmanship of some of the most talented jewellers in the Caribbean, from the cultured and polished work Alchemy from Trinidad, to the fine detailing of John "Ding" King from Barbados, and the youthful effervescence of Deane- Hughes Designs from Guyana
Rings (from the Alchemy collection): 18-carat gold, carved amber and silver inlaid with amber and opals;18-carat gold, amber and ivory inlaid with diamonds; aquamarine, 18-carat gold and oxidised silver inlaid with diamonds. Photograph by 
Woodbury & Associates

Jamaican art: open house

Founded forty years ago, the National Gallery of Jamaica has long taken a leading role in the country’s art scene. Now innovative new programmes are attracting a broader audience, Kellie Magnus discovers. Meanwhile, the new art space NLS is opening doors for younger artists