Caribbean Beat Magazine

The Carnival photo I can’t forget | Portfolio

February brings T&T’s annual Carnival, and 2021 — with the physical festival cancelled due to the COVID-19 pandemic — is a year to reminisce about Carnivals past. We asked three photographers — Jason C. Audain, Maria Nunes, and Shaun Rambaran — to choose one favourite image from their respective Carnival archives, and tell us the story behind it. As it turns out, the photos they chose all had something in common

Shynel Brizan’s moko jumbie queen Mariella, the Shadow of Consciousness. Photo by Shaun Rambaran

Carnival backstage | Closeup

Carnival is a time to shine: from performers on the soca and calypso stage to costumed masqueraders in the street and fete-goers showing off their most acrobatic dance moves. But “the greatest show on earth” wouldn’t be possible without the dedication of the many thousands who work behind the scenes — year-round or seasonally — on the organisation and logistics of the festival. Laura Dowrich-Phillips and Georgia Popplewell meet four of the people whose backstage efforts make Carnival happen

Photo by Kibwe Brathwaite

Kambule: on morning ground | Snapshot

Early each Carnival Friday morning, before dawn breaks, crowds assemble at Piccadilly Greens in east Port of Spain for a re-enactment of a key event in the history of Trinidad — and of Carnival itself. Attillah Springer gives an intimate account of Kambule, when the spirits of the ancestors are invoked in a ritual of memory, story, song, and resistance

Kambule performers re-enact the beginning of the 1881 Canboulay Riots. Photo by Maria Nunes