The Mahaica River is home to dozens of Guyana’s bird species. Photo by Pete Oxford

Mahaica Dawn | Offtrack

Southeast of Georgetown, the lower Mahaica River runs through rice paddies and vegetable fields, but the intact native vegetation along its banks is a refuge for numerous birds and other wildlife. Janette Bulkan and John Palmer head out on an early-morning boat trip, encountering dozens of Guyana’s colourful bird species.

Photo by Pete Oxford

Lethem, Guyana | Neighbourhood

Far from Georgetown and the Atlantic coast, Guyana’s raffish border town is a gateway to neighbouring Brazil — and to the adventures of the Rupununi, with its rolling savannahs, misty mountains, forests, birds, and beasts.

Chronixx (a.k.a. Jamar McNaughton) • Reggae artist • Jamaica, Born 1992. Photo by Nickii Kane

25 Caribbean achievers under 25

Caribbean Beat celebrates its 25th anniversary in 2017. But this isn’t only an opportunity to look back at our quarter century of publication: it’s also a moment to look ahead to the new generation of talented, determined Caribbean people who will shape the decades ahead. In this special feature, we introduce 25 remarkable young people aged 25 and under. Athletes and entrepreneurs, artists and scientists — they and their contemporaries are the future of our region.

Rough dirt roads cross the sparsely 
populated landscape of the Pakaraimas. Photo by Nikhil Ramkarran

Pakaraima bound

The spectacular Pakaraima Mountains, near Guyana’s border with Brazil and Venezuela, are a landscape of dramatic table-top mountains, rolling valleys, and remote villages. It’s not an easy part of the world for outsiders to visit. But the annual Pakaraima Mountain Safari attracts visitors hungry for adventure — like Neil Marks.

Photo by Amanda Richards

Layover: Georgetown, Guyana

On a business trip to Guyana’s capital with a few hours to spare? A free day to explore? Our quick guide to getting the most out of Georgetown when time is tight.

Illustration by Rohan Mitchell

Wilson Harris — into the interior

The Guyanese writer Wilson Harris, celebrating his ninety-fifth birthday in 2016, has lived far from his home country for many years — but Guyana’s landscape and history continue to haunt his magical imagination. James Ferguson explains how Harris’s novels bring together reality and dream.

A flock of scarlet ibis take flight over the mudflats of Guyana’s eastern coast. Photo by Pete Oxford

Guyana times five

Stretching six hundred miles from north to south, Guyana is “the land of many waters” — but also of many landscapes, from coast to mountain, river to savannah. As the country celebrates its fiftieth anniversary of Independence, we explore its stunning beauty through photos, while Brendan de Caires visits the “afterworld” of the Rupununi and Vidyaratha Kissoon and David Papannah explore the unique atmosphere of Georgetown.

Nalo Hopkinson. Photo by David Findlay, courtesy Nalo Hopkinson

Stories of what-if

Call it sci-fi, speculative fiction, fantasy — it’s one of the world’s most popular genres of storytelling, and a growing wave of Caribbean writers are bringing our voices, culture, and history to tales of mythical pasts and thrilling futures, lost worlds and faraway planets. Philip Sander talks to sci-fi authors Nalo Hopkinson, Tobias Buckell, Karen Lord, and R.S.A. Garcia.

Photo by Amanda Richards

Flying season

Breezy dry season weather across the Caribbean makes Easter the perfect time to test your kite-building and -flying skills.

A75T6X Taino Indian petroglyphs on basalt rock on the Caribbean island of St. Kitts

First things first: the Caribbean’s First Peoples

The Caribbean’s First Peoples shaped our landscapes, language, and culture — and across the region, our indigenous heritage remains within reach, if you know where to look.