The Mahaica River is home to dozens of Guyana’s bird species. Photo by Pete Oxford

Mahaica Dawn | Offtrack

Southeast of Georgetown, the lower Mahaica River runs through rice paddies and vegetable fields, but the intact native vegetation along its banks is a refuge for numerous birds and other wildlife. Janette Bulkan and John Palmer head out on an early-morning boat trip, encountering dozens of Guyana’s colourful bird species.

The island of St Martin, which sustained a direct hit from Hurricane Irma, was one of the region’s  worst affected

After the storm | Perspective

In the aftermath of Hurricanes Irma and Maria, here’s how you can help the islands most badly affected.

Ameiva atrata is a ground lizard endemic to Redonda. Photo courtesy Jenny Daltry/Fauna and Flora International

Redonda rescue — saving its native species | Green

Tiny Redonda, with its steep and barren cliffs, is home to colonies of seabirds, rare lizards found nowhere else — and, until recently, hordes of invasive goats and rats. But a new restoration project aims to return Redonda to its original inhabitants. Erline Andrews learns more.

Wind turbines on the coast of Aruba contribute to a goal of one hundred per cent renewable energy 
by 2020. Photo by iStock.com/hairballusa

The energy of the future: renewables in the Caribbean | Green

Year-round sunshine, endless breezes, gushing rivers: most Caribbean countries have ample natural resources to harness renewable energy. So why is the region so dependent on fossil fuels? Erline Andrews investigates.

Photo by ABDESIGN/iStock.com

Born blue: Suriname’s blue poison dart frog

Suriname’s blue poison dart frog is a living treasure of the rainforest.

Illustration by Rohan Mitchell

John James Audubon: The Birdman | On this Day

It’s considered a landmark of ornithology, and it was published one hundred and ninety years ago: John James Audubon’s massive Birds of America. Born in Haiti, Audubon had a restless life spread across continents, but along the way he transformed himself into a leading expert on the birdlife of North America. As James Ferguson explains, his legacy in science and conservation still endures.

Photograph by André Phillip

Mangrove view

A mosaic of greens and blues seen from high above, Barbuda’s Codrington Lagoon is a natural gem, home to mangrove forests and seabird colonies.

Mangrove-lined seashore in Bonaire. Photo by Gail Johnson/Shutterstock.com

Caribbean eco progress report

In the pages of Caribbean Beat, over the past twenty-five years, we’ve often reported on environmental stories. So what’s the real state of progress across the region, when it comes to protecting our natural resources? Nazma Muller investigates.

A colourful Tufted Cocquette poised for a sip of vervine nectar. Photo by Ondrej Prosicky/Shutterstock.com

Grow wild

You don’t need to venture deep into the forest to encounter fascinating wildlife. Even an ordinary urban garden can attract birds, butterflies, and more, if you know how. Sharon Millar tells you how.

La Soufrière caldera, St Vincent. Photo by Jonathan Palmer/Mustique Airways

Caribbean volcanoes: fire down below

Shaped by subterranean forces, the islands of the Lesser Antilles are an arc of volcanoes — some extinct, some dormant, some still active. And among their dramatic forested peaks, crater lakes, and hot springs, amateur vulcanologists (and ordinary tourists) can find ample evidence of our planet’s restless energy.