Programmers, artists, and management of Coded-Arts at the company’s U-Start incubator offices in Caroni, Trinidad. Photo by Mark Lyndersay

The games are afoot | Snapshot

Video games aren’t just for teenagers to have fun — globally, they’re a highly lucrative business, requiring state-of-the-art technical know-how, creative flair, and significant investment. Mark Lyndersay meets the minds behind Couple Six and Coded-Arts, video game developers in Barbados and T&T, whose agenda includes creating games that reflect the culture of their home islands.

The Mahaica River is home to dozens of Guyana’s bird species. Photo by Pete Oxford

Mahaica Dawn | Offtrack

Southeast of Georgetown, the lower Mahaica River runs through rice paddies and vegetable fields, but the intact native vegetation along its banks is a refuge for numerous birds and other wildlife. Janette Bulkan and John Palmer head out on an early-morning boat trip, encountering dozens of Guyana’s colourful bird species.

The island of St Martin, which sustained a direct hit from Hurricane Irma, was one of the region’s  worst affected

After the storm | Perspective

In the aftermath of Hurricanes Irma and Maria, here’s how you can help the islands most badly affected.

Ameiva atrata is a ground lizard endemic to Redonda. Photo courtesy Jenny Daltry/Fauna and Flora International

Redonda rescue — saving its native species | Green

Tiny Redonda, with its steep and barren cliffs, is home to colonies of seabirds, rare lizards found nowhere else — and, until recently, hordes of invasive goats and rats. But a new restoration project aims to return Redonda to its original inhabitants. Erline Andrews learns more.

Wind turbines on the coast of Aruba contribute to a goal of one hundred per cent renewable energy 
by 2020. Photo by iStock.com/hairballusa

The energy of the future: renewables in the Caribbean | Green

Year-round sunshine, endless breezes, gushing rivers: most Caribbean countries have ample natural resources to harness renewable energy. So why is the region so dependent on fossil fuels? Erline Andrews investigates.

Fields of spiky Aloe vera in Hato, Aruba. Photo by Jimmyvillalta/iStock.com

Aloe vera: the thorny balm

The spiky Aloe vera plant is a favourite of Caribbean gardens, its bitter gel used as a moisturiser, stomach remedy, and ingredient in healthy tonics. You might imagine you could build a whole industry around this handy plant — and Aruba has done just that. Shelly-Ann Inniss visits the island’s biggest aloe farm, and learns how this wonder of the kitchen and medicine cabinet is an economic wonder, too.

Photo by ABDESIGN/iStock.com

Born blue: Suriname’s blue poison dart frog

Suriname’s blue poison dart frog is a living treasure of the rainforest.

Illustration by Rohan Mitchell

John James Audubon: The Birdman | On this Day

It’s considered a landmark of ornithology, and it was published one hundred and ninety years ago: John James Audubon’s massive Birds of America. Born in Haiti, Audubon had a restless life spread across continents, but along the way he transformed himself into a leading expert on the birdlife of North America. As James Ferguson explains, his legacy in science and conservation still endures.

Photograph by André Phillip

Mangrove view

A mosaic of greens and blues seen from high above, Barbuda’s Codrington Lagoon is a natural gem, home to mangrove forests and seabird colonies.

Mangrove-lined seashore in Bonaire. Photo by Gail Johnson/Shutterstock.com

Caribbean eco progress report

In the pages of Caribbean Beat, over the past twenty-five years, we’ve often reported on environmental stories. So what’s the real state of progress across the region, when it comes to protecting our natural resources? Nazma Muller investigates.